Sunday, September 21, 2014

How to Catch Those Pesky Typos - Aaron Lazar


How to Catch Those Pesky Typso Typos



copyright aplazar 2014



It’s one of the hardest parts of being a writer, don’t you think? Editing your own work, running over the same pages over and over again…and still, if you’re human, it’s inevitable that you’ll miss a quotation mark here, an extra space there, or worse, a typo.

You know that reading your own words is the most difficult scenario for proofing, don’t you? Your big, beautiful brain is so good at translating what you physically “see” on the page into what your mind “knows” you “meant” to type, that it usually will glide right over an extra “the” or a missing “a.”

Yes, it purposefully corrects the errors, without even notifying you!

You can read the same sentence a hundred times, and it’ll look great to you. Your mind interprets it as you intended it. And when the first person to take a look at your book finds a glaring omission, or an extra word in that lovely prose, you may feel like an incompetent idiot.

You thought you were careful. Right? You worked so hard to catch those typos.

When it first happens, it's embarrassing. But over time, you’ll learn you cannot catch all of the errors by yourself.

I’ve written twenty-two books, so I’ve been through this process a few times. (you can see them at www.lazarbooks.com, including my newest release, Betrayal.) Over the years, I’ve had publishing house editors go over my manuscripts. They found errors, I fixed them. And I tried not to make more errors when I made the corrections, which is all too common.

We had the first and second edits, then copy edits in the end to make sure we didn’t miss anything. Once in a while, in spite of our best efforts, an error would creep through. Humiliated, I’d beat myself up for this one stupid error and swear it would never happen again. 

Because, you see, I, like you, get upset when I see typos in a best selling book. I used to think, "How can they have missed them?" "How hard can it be to find them?" "Didn't they even READ this thing?"

It was very humbling and illuminating to discover that sometimes, in spite of heroic efforts, these pesky mistakes can make it through to the final version. It happens to the best of us. 

As time went on, I learned that beta readers were an amazing asset. Not only were they excellent at finding and spotting typos, but if you found talented readers or writers with a knack for literary insight (like my beta readers!), they would point out inconsistencies in a scene or even mention when they thought a character went beyond their natural boundaries. My beta readers have helped my books become the best they can be, and I love them. ;o)

Over the years I’ve developed friendships with writers and readers, and I’d offer them the job of beta reading my manuscripts before I submitted the book to my publisher. It worked out very well, and I always felt better when they’d read through my books. On average, I have 10-12 people read the manuscript before I consider it “close to done.”

Of those twenty-two books, I’ve published fifteen through a traditional small press since 2007, and have recently moved on to self publish (through Kindle Select) seven more that were waiting in the publishing queue in the past year. Polishing and proofing all of these manuscripts was a real challenge, and my beta readers did me proud. But believe it or not – they didn’t catch all the typos.

I have discovered there is one more essential step to proofing one’s manuscript: reading it aloud.

Yes, it’s something you can do yourself. It might take you a whole weekend to get through it. But it’s worth the effort. Better yet, if you have a narrator who is recording the audio book version, this is where the final catches will be found. 

Aside: I recommend that authors release all books in this order: eBook, audio book, print.

I have found that my best narrators (actors, really, with great attention to detail) have consistently isolated a couple of leftover “extra or missing letters/words” which are the hardest to find. Sure, with a real typo, like a misspelled word, MS Word underlines it for you in red. Those aren’t too hard to find. It’s harder when you have an extra preposition in a sentence, or a misused word like “here” instead of “hear.” MS Word doesn’t often catch those mistakes.

I find these errors creep in at the end of a work in progress, when I’ve gone through to beef up a sentence or make changes in general. Then I don’t always “cut” fully or “paste” fully and that’s my downfall! Creating typos because you’re fixing another typo is annoying, but pretty common.

Does that happen to you?

Here’s my advice on how to produce a typo-free book. 
1) When creating your book, try to find a writer or reader friend who will swap chapters with you as you write it. You read their stuff, they read yours. You help them, they help you. It’s all good. They can help you cull out that first crop of errors, right off the bat.
2) When you’re done writing the book, go through it until you feel you are satisfied. This may take multiple read-throughs. It all depends on how careful you were the first time around when creating the story.
3) Ask another good friend to check it over, so you can be sure you didn’t make any really embarrassing faux pas.
4) Draft beta readers to help you. This may take years of cultivating friends and readers, but it is worth its weight in gold.
5) Review it a few more times yourself after you’ve incorporated beta edits (remember, just use what makes sense to you, you don’t want to lose your focus!)
6) Release the book as an eBook.
7) Find reviewers. Watch the comments come in from readers. Notice if anyone mentions typos! If so, go after them immediately. In this day and age, it’s easy to fix a file and reload it up to your seller’s page. Repost the eBook with the changes. (easy peasy if you are on Amazon)
8) Post the file on ACX (Audiobook Creation Exchange) to find the perfect narrator. Choose him/her carefully.
9) Send the manuscript to your audio book narrator to read before they begin production. 
10) When they find a few mistakes – fix them. Reload the eBook to correct these things.
11) Let the narrator finish the audiobook recording. If they find anything else (at this point it might just be a missing quotation mark, or an extra space), then upload the corrected eBook again. Now it should be close to perfect.
12) At this point, it’s safe to start thinking about creating your print version. I use Create Space and have been very happy with their quality and support. 
13) Order a proof (or two, or three, depending on what you find and fix!) before you finalize the manuscript. NEVER just review it online – you need to hold it in your hands, go through it page by page. Formatting can be tricky at first, so make sure you focus on page numbers and margin spacing before you let it go live. And read this printed version one more time – you might find another error! 
14) Send an autographed copy of your print book to all your beta readers – they worked hard for this, and they deserve a special treat!

Even with this painstaking approach, once in a while something slips through. It’s disappointing if it happens, but it’s probably God’s way of keeping us humble. ;o)

Let me know what you think in the comments below. And remember, if you love to write, write like the wind!

Aaron Paul Lazar






8 comments:

Aaron Lazar said...

And if you see any typos in the above, please let me know, LOL!!!

Dora Machado said...

Excellent advice!!! I didn't find any typos here, but boy, sometimes they do like to hide from my tired eyes. LOL.

Polly Iyer said...

I was shocked at how many goofs my narrators found. I'm sure, no matter how many times my books are read by me and others, there will always be a mistake, or two, or... don't go there, Polly. It's disheartening. We justify our errors by saying we've seen them in the books of the big 5. That still doesn't help. Indie writers must be better because we're constantly judged by a different measuring stick. It's not fair, but it's just the way it is.

Aaron Lazar said...

Thank you, Dora. I know exactly what you mean!

Aaron Lazar said...

Polly, I'm glad it's not just me. Sometimes I think it's impossible to create a perfect book!

Beryl S. Bissell said...

Thanks Aaron. One reader gave me four stars (would have given me five) for the Scent of God because she found several typos and a misused word. I went right back and reread the whole thing, but was too lazy to read it out loud. Well, back to the book . . .

Aaron Lazar said...

Hi, Beryl! Thanks for weighing in on this. I just got my first reviewer comment about typos in The Seacrest. Drat! I thought I'd got them all...but now I must search them out. Ugg! Happy writing. ;o)

Hunter Murphy said...

Aaron, this is pure gold. I love your suggestion about ebook, audio book, and then print. I'm about to start this journey of self-publishing, so I really appreciate reading such helpful articles from fellow writers. Good work and best to you!

Hunter (Murphy)